HP DisplayLink docking station in Ubuntu

DisplayLink docking stations works really good in Ubuntu. A list of supported devices can be found here.

I had the possibility to try out with one from HP, and there was some additional steps except from installing the DisplayLink driver for Ubuntu that was necessary to get a good experience (at least for me).

Start by downloading the deb package for Ubuntu here. Extract and install:

cd ~/Downloads
unzip DisplayLink\ USB\ Graphics\ Software\ for\ Ubuntu\ 1.2.1.zip
sudo bash displaylink-driver-1.2.65.run

It is easiest to just reboot your computer after the installation is done. I usually don’t plugin the docking station until I get to lightdm login screen.

You might have to adjust the order of the monitors under System settings, Display you have more than one external monitor connected.

Every time the HP docking station is connected, it will mount a USB mass storage device, containing the Windows drivers. This is quite annoying, but it’s easy to fix by blacklisting it with a udev rule. I also wanted to blacklist the Ethernet interface, since it isn’t used (and also caused problems NetworkManager dropping the wireless connections sometimes).

For the version of the docking station I was using, the following two rules would take care of that:

sudo bash -c 'tee /etc/udev/rules.d/98-displaylink-ignore.rules <<EOF
# Disable displaylink (port replicator) ethernet device
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", DRIVER=="cdc_ncm", ATTRS{interface}=="HP USB Giga Ethernet", \
ATTR{authorized}="0"

# Disable displaylink (port replicator) usb disk
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTRS{idProduct}=="1165", ATTRS{idVendor}=="048d", \
ATTRS{manufacturer}=="iTE Tech", ATTR{authorized}="0"
EOF'

As always, udevadm info -a -p and the corresponding sysfs class path for the device, is the way to find correct information for your particular device.

Reload the udev rules without restarting:

sudo udevadm control --reload-rules

Build i3-gaps in Docker

Automated way

So, the very automated way:

git clone git@github.com:mgor/docker-ubuntu-i3-gaps-builder.git
cd docker-ubuntu-i3-gaps-builder/
make

Packages available in packages/.

Build environment

First, get the build environment and start it:

git clone git@github.com:mgor/docker-ubuntu-pkg-builder.git
cd docker-ubuntu-pkg-builder
make

Dependencies

Install the needed dependencies:

apt update
apt install libxcb1-dev libxcb-keysyms1-dev \
libpango1.0-dev libxcb-util0-dev libxcb-icccm4-dev \
libyajl-dev libstartup-notification0-dev \
libxcb-randr0-dev libev-dev libxcb-cursor-dev \
libxcb-xinerama0-dev libxcb-xkb-dev libxkbcommon-dev \
libxkbcommon-x11-dev
apt-get build-dep i3

Build

Get i3-gaps from github[0].

git clone https://www.github.com/Airblader/i3 i3-gaps
cd i3-gaps

If you want to run on the stable branch:

git checkout gaps
git pull

Build the packages:

debuild -i -us -uc -b

If successful, the packages will be in ../. Transfer them to your host and install.

Run production WordPress site in docker for development

I have a couple of WordPress sites that I wanted to create local development environments in docker for, here are some tips on how to get it to work.

I use the official MySQL and WordPress docker images. The directory structure is as follows:

dev-env.sh:

update-development-site.sh:

production_dump.sql is a MySQL dump of the production database, add a “use wordpress-site;” statement in the beginning so that the backup is imported into the correct database.

Intervju med C++ fader, Bjarne Stroustrup

Sitter på tåget ner mot Linköping (och senare Tranås) för att imorgon ta mig ner till Göteborg (West Coast Riot + Metaltown!). Sitter och ska skumma igenom dagens nördnyheter på slashdot och hittar en riktigt intressant intervju med C++ fader. Det är oerhört underhållande läsning för den som är intresserad.

Bjarne Stroustrup of C++ fame dissects the history of his famed programming language

Everybody agreed that semantically ++C would have been even better, but I thought that would create too many problems for non-geeks.

Fighting the type system (with lots of casts and macros) is futile.

C++ makes it harder to shoot yourself in the foot; but when you do, it takes off the whole leg.

Maybe there is a collation between language success and appreciation of Monty Python?